Yeast - Description of peroxins and PEX genes

mips


Created and provided to MIPS by Ben Distel
 
PEX Gene Peroxin Characteristics Formerly
PEX1 117-127 kDa AAA ATPase; subcellular distribution is unknown; mutations responsible form complementation group 1 of the PBD ScPAS1 (12); PpPAS1 (16); HsPEX1 (51, 52)
PEX2 C3HC4 zinc-binding integral peroxisomal membrane protein; 35-52 kDa; mutations responsible for complementation group10 of the PBD. RnPAF1 (33); HsPAF1 (29) PaCAR1(2); PpPER6 (39) ScPAS5 
PEX3 51-52 kDa integral peroxisomal membrane protein lacking similarity to other proteins ScPAS3 (17); HpPER9  (1)
PEX4 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme ScPAS2 (41); PpPAS4 (3)
PEX5 PTS1 receptor; 64-69 kDa protein containing 8-9 tetratricopeptide repeats; localized to the cytoplasm and peroxisome; mutations responsible for complementation group 2 of the PBD. PpPAS8 (24); ScPAS10 (36); HsPXR1 (5,13,42); HpPER3 (35); HpPAH2 (27); YlPAY32 (31)
PEX6 Belongs to the AAA family of ATPases; 112-127 kDa; localized to cytoplasm and peroxisome; mutations responsible for complementation group 4 of the PBD. PpPAS5 (30); ScPAS8 (38); YlPAY4 (25); RnPAF2 (34); HsPXAAA1 (43)
PEX7 PTS2 receptor; 42 kDa protein containing six WD40 repeats; localized to the cytosol and peroxisome; mutations responsible for complementation group 11 of the PBD ScPAS7 (23); ScPEB1 (44); HsPEX7 (53, 54, 55)
PEX8 71-81 kDa peroxisome-associated protein containing a PTS1 signal. HpPER1 (40); PpPER3 (20); ScPAS6
PEX9 42 kDa integral peroxisomal membrane protein lacking similarity to other proteins. YlPAY2 (6)
PEX10 C3HC4zinc-binding integral peroxisomal membrane protein; 34-48 kDa. HpPER8 (32); PpPAS7 (19); ScPAS4
PEX11 27-32 kDa peroxisome-associated protein involved in peroxisome proliferation ScPMP27 (9,22); CbPMP30 (28)
PEX12 48 kDa C3HC4 zinc-binding integral peroxisomal membrane protein; mutations responsible for complementation group 3 of the PBD PpPAS10 (18); ScPAS11; HsPEX12 (56)
PEX13 SH3-containing, 40-43 kDa integral peroxisomal membrane protein; binds the PTS1 receptor ScPAS20 (7); PpPAS6 (14); HsPEX13 (14)
PEX14 38 kDa peroxisome associated protein, binds both PTS1 and PTS2 receptor and Pex13p-SH3 HpPEX14 (47);ScPEX14 (48)
PEX15 44 kDa phosphorylated integral peroxisomal membrane protein, no homolog in other organism ScPAS21 (57)
PEX16 44 kDa peripheral protein located at the matrix face of the peroxisomal membrane, no homolog in other organism YlPEX16 (49)
PEX17 23 kDa peroxisome associated protein, binds Pex14p ScPAS9 (48,58)
PEX18 66 kDa protein containing a PTS2, homology to kinases implicated in thiamine biosynthesis, disruption results in abbarent peroxisome morphology HpPER6
PEX19 40 kDa farnesylated protein associated with peroxisomes ScPAS12 (50)
 

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updated Tue Feb 10 1998